England     
 
     
For information and a larger map of the country, click on the map above.
 
 

Sites
 

Windsor Castle
 
Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln Castle
 
Belton House, Grantham
 
Rushton Hall, Kettering
 
Blickling Hall
 
Felbrigg Hall
 
Stonehenge
 
Newark Castle

Peterborough Cathedral

 

 

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England - London
 
 
England
 
 

Windsor

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle is the world’s oldest and largest occupied castle dating back to the 11th century and William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I (1100 – 1135) it has been used by the English Monarch and has undergone substantial enlargements and improvements from Henry II (1154 – 1189)  up to the present Queen Elizabeth II who uses it as a private residence during her weekends and also for ceremonial and State occasions. READ MORE

 
 

 

Lincoln

Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln Cathedral, The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, is one of England’s finest Gothic cathedrals. Located in the historic city of Lincoln, it was commissioned by William the Conqueror in 1072 and was constructed on the site of an Anglo Saxon church. The building was completed in 1092 under the supervision of Bishop Regimus. In 1142 it was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and expanded by Bishop Alexander (known as ‘the Magnificent’). READ MORE

 

 


 

Lincoln Castle

Located in the city of Lincoln, which by Norman times, rated third in prosperity and importance of the cities in England. Something that was due to its location and proximity of roads and rivers. Following the defeat of the English by William Duke of Normandy (William the Conqueror) at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William encountered resistance to his rule particularly in the North of the country and wished to consolidate his position; one such way of doing this was to construct a number of castles. In 1068 he commenced the construction of Lincoln Castle on the site of the former Roman fort at the top of the hill. READ MORE


 

Grantham

Belton House

Located on the outskirts of Grantham, Lincolnshire, the Grade I listed building of Belton House is one of the finest examples of Carolean (Restoration) Architecture, which became popular following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. 

Set in parkland and a number of gardens, the estate contains an orangery and, although not part of Belton House, the grounds contain the Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul which dates back to Norman times and is the burial place of many of the previous owners of the estate. READ MORE

 


Kettering

Rushton Hall

Acquired by William Tresham in 1438, Rushton Hall remained in the Tresham family for nearly 200 years. During that time it was developed to incorporate a number of architectural styles.  Rushton Hall survived Francis Tresham’s involvement in the Gunpowder Plot!! His involvement in the Plot resulted in his death in the Tower of London in 1605.   The Hall then passed to his son Lewis Tresham who sold it to Sir William Cockayne in 1619. The estate later came back to the Treshams through the marriage of the then owner, the 2nd Viscount Cullan to Elizabeth Tresham, although it subsequently had to be sold as a result of the couple’s extravagant life style. READ MORE

 


Norfolk

Blickling Hall

Blickling Hall is located in the village of Blickling, north of Aylsham, Norfolk and dates back to the 11th century when it was the manor house of Harold Godwinson who, on the death of King Edward the Confessor, become the King of England. Following Harold’s death at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 and the succession of William I, the house was given by William to his chaplain. By 1091 it had become the Bishops’ country palace. READ MORE

 


 

Felbrigg Hall

Felbrigg Hall is located at Felbrigg near Norwich, Norfolk and at one time was one of the largest estates in Norfolk. The heart of the estate was built up before the Norman Conquest by the Bigod family who settled following the Danish invasions of the 9th century. The Domesday Book survey in 1086 recorded the village as a possession of the Bigod family, although it is believed to have been owned at one time by Gyrth Godwinson, the brother of King Harold the English King who was defeated at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. READ MORE

 

 


Wiltshire
 
Stonehenge
 
Located 13 km from Salisbury in Wiltshire, Stonehenge is one of the most famous prehistoric monuments in the world. 
 
The first major construction at Stonehenge was a circular ditch, with an inner and outer bank built about 3000 BCE. With its two entrances, the ditch enclosed an area about 100 metres in diameter. Today the banks are visible as low grass earthworks, but a great part of the external bank has been ploughed up. The ditch on the eastern side was excavated in the 1920’s making it deeper than the western side. READ MORE
 
 
 

 
Newark
Newark Castle
 
Built originally around 1070 as a Norman Motte and Bailey earthwork fortress to replace a Saxon fortified manor which had existed on the site in Nottinghamshire since the 10th century. The castle developed around 1133 – 35 when Henry I granted Bishop Alexander of Lincoln - who was the Lord of the Manor of Newark - permission to build a castle this developed into a stone construction towards the end of the 12th century. READ MORE
 
 
 
 


Peterborough
 
Peterborough Cathedral






 
 
 

 

 

All  Photographs Copyright: Ron Gatepain

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