Spain

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Sites
 

Barcelona

Sagrada Familia

Park Güell 

Barcelona Cathedral

 

Tarragona

Cartagena

Roman Theatre

Cordoba
Mosque/Cathedral

Santiago de Compostela

Cathedral

Orihuela

Town Wall Museum

Salvador and Santa Maria Cathedral

 
Granada
 
The Alhambra
 
 
Valencia
 
Cathedral of the Holy Chalice
 
 
Poblet
 
Poplet Abbey/Monestery
 

Mallorca

Palma Cathedral

Almudaina Palace
 
Spain

 
 Barcelona 

Sagrada Família

Sagrada Família or the church of The Holy Family is sometimes referred to as Gaudi’s Cathedral after the architect who gave it its unique design, Antoni Gaudi; although it is not a cathedral.   The decision to construct a church in Barcelona dedicated to the Holy Family was taken in 1874 by Josep Bocebella. In 1881 the land was purchased and the following year on March 19, the foundation stone was laid by the Bishop of Barcelona.  READ MORE

 

 

 
 


 
Park Güell 
 
Located in the Gràcia district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Park Güell is a garden complex with architectural elements designed by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí and built from 1900 to 1914. Covering an area of over 17 hectors it is one of the largest architectural works in south Europe. 
 
The park was originally intended to be a residential complex and consist of 60 luxury houses. The idea for the site was that of Count Eusebi Güell, after whom the park was named and was based on the English garden city movement. READ MORE
 
 
 
 


Barcelona Cathedral




COMING SOON

 




 

 



Tarragona

Tarragona

Located in the region of Catalonia on the East coast of Spain, Tarragona is approximately 60 miles (98 km) from Barcelona. The city dates back to the Phoenicians when it was called Tarchon. During the Second Punic War, (218 – 201 BC) Tarragona was taken by the Romans and became the main military base in Hispania. Over the next 200 years it was used as the base in the conquest of the whole of the Iberian Peninsula and was the Capital of Hispania Citerior, which later became Hispania Tarraconensis, one of Rome’s two colonies on the Iberian Peninsula and the empire’s largest province; at that time the city was known as Tarraco.  READ MORE

 

 


 

Cartagena

The Roman Theatre

Located in the city of Cartagena in the South East region of Spain the city was known as Carthago Nova following its conquest in 209 BC by the Roman general Scipio Africanus. The city came to prominence in 228 BC when it was taken by the Carthaginian general Hadrubal as a base for the conquest of Spain due to its strategic harbour, and given the name of Qart Hadasht which means New City after Carthage. The city became pivotal in the conquest of the area both for the Carthaginians and later the Romans. In 298 AD the Roman emperor Diocletian established the province of Hispania with Carthago Nova as its capital. Over the years it has held a number of other names instigated by different emperors. READ MORE

 
 

 

Cordoba

Mosque/Cathedral

The first religious building to stand on the site of the Mosque-cathedral in Cordoba, was a Roman temple dedicated to Janus, but following the withdrawal of the Romans from the Iberian Peninsula in the 6th century, Cordoba fell in 572 to the Visigoths. They constructed a Christian Church dedicated to St Vincent of Saragossa on the site of the Roman temple which remained in the hands of the Visigoths until the arrival of the Muslims in 711, although Christian continued to worship there until 714.  READ MORE

 



 
Santiago de Compostela
 
Santiago de Compostela Cathedral
 
santiago de Compostela is located in Galicia in north-western Spain and is famous for its Cathedral, which was built on the shrine of Saint James, (son of Zebedee) one of the Apostles of Jesus. The cathedral is the destination for Catholic pilgrims who complete the Way of Saint James, a pilgrimage which originated in the 9th century and is the third most popular pilgrimage for Christians/Catholics.  READ MORE

 

 


 
Orihuela
 
Orihuela Town Wall Museum
 
The city of Orihuela lies between Alicante and Murcia on the Costa Blanca. Its archaeological ruins of the town wall and buildings were discovered in 1998 during construction work for the University of Orihuela. Their importance resulted in them being integrated into the basement of the building, and to the establishment of the Wall Museum, to enable them to be preserved and viewed. READ MORE
 
 
 

 
 
Salvador and Santa Maria Cathedral
 
Located in the old quarter in the centre of Orihuela, the Holy Cathedral Church of the Saviour and Saint Mary was originally constructed as a Parish church on the site of the Aljama Mosque at the beginning of the 13th century. In 1281 it became the main church for the area and in 1510 Pope Julius II awarded it cathedral status although it represented the Dioceses of Orihuela and Cartagena with the one Bishop presiding over both. It was not until 1564 that a post of Bishop of  Orihuela was created and the Bishopric was consecrated in 1597.  READ MORE
 
 

 
 
 
Granada
 
The Alhambra
 
Located at the top of al-Sabika Hill, in a strategic position overlooking the city of Granada. The Alhambra gets its name from the red walls that surround the structure. Its’ name coming from the Arabic qa'lat al-Hamra' which means Red Castle.
 
Although a fortress existed on the site before the Muslims arrived in Granada in the 8th century, and documents exist confirming that Sawwar ben Hamdun sought shelter there during the conflict that occurred within the Caliphate of Cordoba, to which Granada then belonged, and it is believed that it was at that time that the castle was constructed turning it into a military fortress. READ MORE
 
 


 
Valencia
 
Cathedral of the Holy Chalice
 
The Gothic Cathedral located in the old town at the centre of Valencia is known as “Saint Mary's Cathedral”, “The Basilica of the Assumption of Our Lady of Valencia” or just as "Valencia Cathedral".

Built on the site that was previously a Roman temple, a Visigoth cathedral and an 8th century Mosque, it was several decades after the Christian conquest of the city (1238), before the cathedral was constructed, between 1252 and 1482. Construction is in the Gothic style, although it contains elements of early Romanesque, Renaissance, Baroque and Neoclassical.  READ MORE
 
 


 
Xàtiva
 
Xàtiva Castle


COMING SOON




 

 
 
Poblet
 
Royal Abbey of Santa Maria de Poblet Monastery
 
 
 
COMING SOON
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mallorca
 
 
Palma

Palma Cathedral
 
Christianity came to the island of Mallorca in the 5th century and it is known that the Bishop of Majorca attended a Synod at Carthage in 484 due to the existence of documentary evidence.

During the 9th century a series of battles took place between Christians and Muslims for the control of the island and when the Arabs conquered it in 903 under Emir Isam el Jawlani, they were, as they were through-out their area of domination, tolerant of the Christian religion.  READ MORE
 


 
Almudaina Palace
 
Located overlooking the sea on the site of a prehistoric town, the Palace still contains the ruins from that period some of which can still be seen at the lower level of the palace. When the island was conquered by the Romans in 121 B.C. they chose the site to house a fort, which remained there until it was destroyed by the Vandals in the 5th century, who then construct one of their own on the same site. READ MORE


 




 
 

Copyright © 2018. Photographs:  Ron Gatepain

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